5 books that remind us where Veterans Day came from

Never forget. With the 100th anniversary of what was then called The Great War (no one thought we could possibly do it again, but we sure showed them…), it’s a good time to review what led us there, as well as how terrible the war was. Here are a few books to get you started. Share other books on World War One in the comments. 1. All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque. Written from the perspective of a German soldier in the last year of the…

Book Review | This Town: Two Parties and a Funeral — plus plenty of valet parking! — in America’s Gilded Capital by Mark Leibovich

If you needed any reason to be cynical about American politics, then Mark Leibovich’s This Town: Two Parties and a Funeral — plus plenty of valet parking! — in America’s Gilded Capital is the book for you. I guarantee that you will not put it down with a single breath of hope and optimism  about the future of our country remaining in you. Unless, of course, you’re one of the few wealthy or connected enough to be one of the elites. On the other hand, maybe some healthy skepticism about government is…

Book Review | The Generals: American Military Command from World War II to Today by Thomas E. Ricks

Rumor has it that Utah Superintendent Brad Smith had recommended to his staff at the Utah Office of Education Thomas E. Ricks’ The Generals: American Military Command from World War II to Today. I had no idea if it was true, or why, but with Smith’s reputation for a disruptive leader and the apparent waves he was making to Utah education, I decided it was worth picking up the book to see if it shed any light on his philosophy. I’m glad I did. After finishing it in late August, I find myself recommending Thomas Ricks’…

Book Review | American Exceptionalism: An Experiment in History by Charles Murray

American Exceptionalism: An Experiment in History weighs in at a little under fifty, four-by-six pages (not including notes and citations). It’s pretty light weight, especially as it goes for books on politics or history. And yet, Charles Murray does not disappoint. He packs in a lot of interesting ideas in a short amount of time. Murray opens by looking at misconceptions about what American exceptionalism means. Rather than using the definition of “exceptional” that means “wonderful,” Murray notes that at the founding of the country, and indeed for most of…

Review – Mormon Rivals: The Romneys, the Huntsmans and the Pursuit of Power by Matt Canham and Thomas Burr

Mormon Rivals: The Romneys, the Huntsmans and the Pursuit of Power is an engrossing political drama, an in-depth look at the lives, families, history of and connections between two of the biggest names in politics to come out of Mormon ranks in a generation. Authors Matt Canham and Thomas Burr are masters of their subject, weaving a fascinating look at how the two families took parallel paths to rise from pioneers on the American frontier to leadership on the national political stage. For political junkies, Mormon Rivals, published by the…

Book Review: Feardom by Connor Boyack

I’ve long followed Connor Boyack’s career. A libertarian and out of the box thinker, Boyack has never been afraid to defend his conclusions, and he does so with articulation and passion. His latest literary foray is no exception. In Feardom: How Politicians Exploit Your Emotions and What You Can Do to Stop Them, Boyack fervently argues for greater individual responsibility in the face of growing and often deceptive government communication and behavior. The argument is timely. Trust in government, whether it is Congress, the White House, the Supreme Court, or…

Book Review: Mia Love — The Rise, Stumble and Resurgence of the Next GOP Star, by Matt Canham, Robert Gehrke and Thomas Burr

With Mia Love: The Rise, Stumble and Resurgence of the Next GOP Star, a biography of Mia Love by Salt Lake Tribune reporter Matt Canham,  with Robert Gehrke and Thomas Burr, readers are fortunate to find a glimpse into the history and biography of Utah’s newest Representative to Congress, the first black, Republican woman to be elected to the United States House of Representatives. The book (which you can find at mialovebook.com or at the Amazon link below) is not authorized by Mia Love or her campaign. Americans should be so lucky as to have…

Utah Politico Summer Reading: Auditor John Dougall

It’s not too late to start a new book, and if you’re Utah State Auditor John “Frugal” Dougall, you’ve started at least three in the time it takes to read this post. If you need a reading suggestion or two, here are a few that Utah’s politicos are reading. This is the twelfth in a series on what Utah’s politicians have on their summer reading lists. Utah State Auditor John Dougall lives in Highland, Utah and getting his summer reading list up was a constantly moving target. Where most politicians shared what they intend to…

Utah Politico Summer Reading: Lieutenant Governor Spencer J Cox

It’s not too late to start a new book. And if you need a good idea or two, here are a few that Utah’s politicos are reading. This is the eleventh in a series on what Utah’s politicians have on their summer reading lists. Lieutenant Governor Spencer Cox hails from Fairview, Utah and was eager to share his summer book list selections, the reading of which he manages to squeeze in between BMX stunts and driving in the demolition derby. In addition to the weighty biographies and current events selections below, Cox also said he’ll also probably pick up…

Utah Politico Summer Reading: Senator Todd Weiler

It’s not too late to start a new book. And if you need a good idea or two, here are a few that Utah’s politicos are reading.  This is the tenth in a series on what Utah’s politicians have on their summer reading lists. Senator Todd Weiler represents Utah Senate 23, which covers parts of both Salt Lake and Davis Counties, and lives in Woods Cross. Todd Weiler’s Summer Reading One Summer: America, 1927 by Bill Bryson Amazon summary: The summer of 1927 began with Charles Lindbergh crossing the Atlantic. Meanwhile, Babe Ruth was closing…