Bob Weaver’s daughter talks about her father, a victim of BLM harassment

Bob Weaver was a great rock hound, known as “Bob the geologist” to his friends and others around Cody, Wyoming. His friends claimed that his skills were so keen that other rock hunters in Cody were jealous of Bob’s uncanny ability to find fossils. It’s possible that this jealousy is what led others to make false reports about Bob’s activities to the US Forest Service (USFS) and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). On the first of December, 2016, six or eight Federal Agents from the Bureau of Land Management…

Man commits suicide after federal bullying over rocks

Robert “Bob” Weaver moved to Cody, Wyoming after his wife passed away in 2001. He loved Geology, fossils, archaeology, and history. When Weaver’s wife passed away from cancer it took its toll on him. He began seeing a therapist for issues related to anxiety and PTSD, according to his close friend Larry Roop. Being a rock hound and spending time mining and exploring was therapeutic for Weaver who, according to all accounts, was one of the kindest guys you would ever meet. Over the years, Bob Weaver became known as…

Fake news about looting used to push federal Bears Ears takeover

San Juan County Commissioner Rebecca Benally testified that not only were the Friends of Cedar Mesa (FCM) and Bureau of Land Management (BLM) accounts of looting inaccurate but that a federal designation would actually increase vandalism and looting due to a massive upswing in tourist traffic. Alarmist stories about widespread looting and vandalism of Native American ruins were used in a media campaign to promote the designation of the Bears Ears region of southeastern Utah as a national monument. Despite the fact that neither President Obama nor his outdoor recreation big wig Interior Secretary, Sally Jewell, have…

It’s easy to play games with other people’s land: Black Diamond v. Rural Utah

This post is a response to an Op-Ed written by Peter Metcalf, CEO and Founder of Black Diamond, Inc., that was published in the Salt Lake Tribune on January 10, 2017 (and linked to below). Let me begin by saying… (1) I enjoy and love spending time on Utah’s public lands. (2) I don’t support a wholesale transfer of public land from the federal government to the state government. BUT… When it comes to analyzing the costs and benefits of designating national monuments and federal land preservation decisions, it is…

Pump the brakes in reaction to Bears Ears

The hot story this week is the presidential decree establishing the Bears Ears National Monument in southeastern Utah. With a swipe of his pen, President Obama set aside over one million acres of Utah wilderness as land too sacred, too historical, too intergenerational and too pristine to be left in the control of anyone and anything short of the all-seeing and all-powerful federal government. Utah conservatives are up in arms. They say President Obama abused the Antiquities Act (he did). They say his timing in doing so as he leaves…

10 Reasons why Utah fights monuments

President Obama and Interior Secretary Sally Jewell are deliberating over whether to designate the Bears Ears National Monument. You can’t walk through a grocery store without seeing newspaper headlines shouting that Utah’s leaders vow to fight the monument. What is going on? This isn’t the first time the passionate politics of presidential monuments have come to the Beehive State, where our motto is “Industry.” In 1996 President Clinton designated the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in south-central Utah. This was the largest monument declaration in the history of the continental US,…

Environmental movement’s strong hold on Utah and the West: “It all ends now”

I’m sure many people don’t quite realize what this election has done to the environmental movement in Utah and throughout the United States. Prior to the election, the movement has had a free reign of terror and a choking strong holding on the western states as well as the rest of the United States. But on Tuesday, November 8, 2016, the bullies were stopped. Tuesday will go down in history as the day they were handed their hat and asked to leave the party. Their control and power ended with…

San Juan County violates due process with wind farm, sticks residents with $250K legal bill

Those familiar with the beautiful view of the Abajo Mountains rising up to the west of Monticello, Utah, have witnessed a startling change in recent years. A large wind farm, reaching up the mountainside from the edge of town, now clutters what was once a breathtaking natural vista. Wind farms have been springing up across the country in response to various state ‘Clean Power’ plans, most of which derive from EPA standards mandating a higher percentage of electricity produced by ‘renewable’ energy sources. Monticello, a largely agricultural and ranching town…

BLM incompetence, threats, and 57,000 acres burned

The Henry’s Creek Fire in Idaho raged out of control for several days burning some 57,000 acres. Heavy winds made it impossible to get the fire under control. The fire was located just east of Idaho Falls Idaho and involved multiple local and federal agencies. According to Bart Stolworthy, a farmer and rancher who owns property in the area, the fire started on Saturday the 20th in a “No Man’s Land” area which is property that the owner doesn’t pay a fire tax. So agencies tend to not respond to…

Check your privilege!

Huffington Post reporter Kate Sheppard, reported, “U.S. Olympians Make Their Case for Preserving Public Lands” in an article published on August 20, 2016. The article goes on to quote a couple Olympic athletes and their views on public lands. Pentathlete Marguax Isakesen was quoted, “Growing up next to the Ozark National Forest shaped me as an athlete and pushed me to become an Olympian.” Tri-athlete Katie Zaferes said, “…I have the opportunity to train in these larger-than-life landscapes that afford me the luxury to run on miles of single track…