Momentary Equality with Amendment 3 Stay

Amy Larsen and Amy Beckstead celebrate after a Davis County judge declared them wife and wife on December 23, 2013.
Amy Larsen and Amy Beckstead celebrate after a Davis County judge declared them wife and wife on December 23, 2013.

Jody Jones and her partner Danielle Torres have been together for eight years, but on December 23, they became fully, legally, married. With their new status, it meant that Danielle would be able to adopt their son that Jody had given birth to a few months before. With the stay on Judge Shelby’s ruling that Amendment 3 was unconstitutional, it meant that adoption proceedings would be halted as well. “We want him to have the protections and rights that every child deserves, ” said Jones.

Thousands of gay and lesbian Utahns were able to finally marry their loves for a two-week period before the stay came down. The status of those marriages is now up in the air, with a final decision likely a year away, and confidence levels vary as to whether or not Amendment 3 will ultimately perish.

“I’m not very confident,” said Jones. “I think there’s still too much pressure against it, especially in Utah. I would like to believe that it would get shot down, but I’m also comfortable in being part of the process. If it doesn’t happen now, it’s moving in the right direction.”

“We were thrilled to finally if only momentarily have equality,” said Amy Larsen, who also married on December 23. “This was not special treatment. This was equal treatment, and that’s all our gay little hearts longed for.”

Larsen longs for the day when it won’t be an issue. “Amendment 3 hurts families, it hurts children, it hurts Americans that just want to have the freedom, the liberty and justice for all.”

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