Thoughts on SB100 and Amendment 3: Delayed Debate, Subordination, and Separation of Powers

UPDATE – February 10, 2014, 2:52 PM.  Daniel Burton of PubliusOnline confirmed with multiple sources at the legislature that it was not Gene Schaerr or the Attorney General’s office that instructed the legislature to put a moratorium on SB100.  This fits better with my impression of Reyes and Schaerr as smart guys and much more experience litigators than myself.  ——————– The talk of the capitol last week was the fate of SB100, Senator Urquhart’s statewide non-discrimination bill, which was tabled — ostensibly along with all other bills related to gay…

Technology in education. Rolling out 600,000 devices state wide.

I think one of the biggest things I am asked as “the IT guy” is, “how can we use technology within the classroom?” I am in a unique position. Aside from working in higher education, one of my favorite aspects has been the ability to work in K-12 education technology. I cut my teeth on this topic working with a good friend of mine who is the technology director in a rural school district.  One of the challenges they had is how to get the technology from the schools spread apart…

Competing Plans on Funding Education

http://www.flickr.com/photos/fulanna/8482679716/

Last year the Senate and House passed S.B. 169, which created an Education Task Force made up of Senate and House leaders. Members of the Legislature touted this as a way to get all legislators on the same page, for the Legislature to define its role in education, and for the creation of a path to move forward together. The task force met during the interim and issued its final report in December, which included specific goals and strategies. Two goals of note were: “To pursue and support the devolution of control from…

Book Review & More: “Free To Learn” by Peter Gray [Utah Political Summary]

For the vast majority of the first 60 years of their lives, nearly every person in the United States is intimately involved in our country’s public education system. You enter when you’re 5 years old (or sooner, in some places) and leave when your 18. If you become a teacher or administrator, you re-enter a scant 4 years later to remain for, potentially, the next 40 years. If you do not become a teacher or administrator, you likely reengage after a 5-15 year hiatus, when your children enter the system…

“On Point,” Jan 31, 2014

Senators Luz Robles and Deidre Henderson are joined by Michelle Mumford, assistant dean at BYU Law School, and Holly Richardson of the “Holly on the Hill” blog. The group discusses the tragic shooting of Sgt. Cory Wride and another officer; congratulates Sen. Robles on her engagement; discusses activity from the first week of the 2014 session; goes in depth on the Uintah Elementary school lunch scandal and Governor Herbert’s State of the State address.