The Slow Death of Google Fiber? CEO out, expansion halted, employees fired

This article was originally posted at FreeUTOPIA.org. I’ve long maintained that Google isn’t in the ISP business for the long haul. I said over four years ago that the odds of your city seeing it were astronomically low. Well, now Google is basically saying the same thing. The CEO announced that they have halted the expansion of the network, let go employees in towns where they haven’t build, oh yeah, and he’s leaving for “other opportunities”. I’ve had multiple first-hand reports of users in Provo who have been unable to get signed…

UTOPIA is not an Internet Service Provider

I have seen many arguments for and against UTOPIA in regards to Internet service and how a city such as Orem should not compete with other broadband Internet Service Providers (ISP), and that we should allow the competitive market to really work this out. There is one single problem with any of these arguments: UTOPIA is not an Internet Service Provider because it only provides the Physical and Data Link layers therefore it cannot compete with CenturyLink, Comcast, Time Warner, or any other ISP. In other words the argument that…

The meat of the Macquarie deal: pay less, get more [The Hub Debate]

This is  a Hub Debate on the proposed Macquarie acquisition of UTOPIA. Participate in the comments or submit a response for publication to UtahPoliticoHub@gmail.com. Resolved: “UTOPIA cities are being offered a lifeline by Macquarie and, despite the estimated $18 to $20 per household utility fee increase, should take the deal.” It’s not too often that you get a win-win scenario, but that’s exactly what Macquarie, an Australian investment bank, is bringing to the table for UTOPIA cities. The meat of the deal is that each household will be assessed a utility fee between $18 and…

Bill Review: HB60 could dismantle municipal fiber networks

Rep. R. Curt Webb recently introduced HB60, a bill that would place very strong limits on municipal fiber optic networks in Utah. An analysis of the bill shows that it is squarely targeted at the UTOPIA fiber optic network, an interlocal agency that counts 18 Utah cities as members. While it’s not unusual to get a bill attempting to further limit expansion or creation of municipal fiber networks, HB60 goes much further by preventing the networks from doing things they are currently allowed to do, apparently with no grandfather clause.