Senate Bill 54 Explained

SB54 is a compromise between Sen. Bramble and the Count My Vote initiative. It requires a party to choose between two paths for narrowing down candidates to one party nominee for the general election ballot. All Political Parties Choose Between Option A or B Option A – Count My Vote: 2% of party member signatures required for each candidate to be placed on a direct primary ballot, choice of open or closed primary. This option is the default option for political parties.  It requires all candidates for office to get signatures…

The Folly of Senate Bill 54

Utah Senate Bill 54 has led quite a life over its short life. Initially introduced as Senator Curt Bramble‘s alternative to Count My Vote (hereafter referred to as CMV), it was initially denounced by CMV supporters and actively campaigned against. It even led to an open statement of support for CMV and denouncement of SB54 by none other than Mitt Romney. Last Thursday CMV announced that they had over 100,000 of the 102,000 required signatures to put it on the ballot, and within 24 hours rumors were flying that some of the top CMV backers were…

BUZZ: CMV and SB54 supporters close to compromise

The word on the street, and on KSL News Radio, is that County My Vote and the legislators behind SB54 are close to a compromise that would allow an alternative path to the ballot and remove the petition requirement in CMV’s initiative language. According to reports on KSL, the compromise would retain the caucus/convention system, but also allow an alternative path to the primary ballot that requires 28,000 signatures for statewide positions and 7,000 for Congressional elections. The report said discussions are ongoing and the number are still in flux,…

SB54 v. Count My Vote

Reform of Utah’s caucus-convention system is always a hot topic among Utah’s politicos, but 2014 has seen the normal controversy escalate beyond more than talk, as there are currently two proposals out there that would seriously alter  Utah’s political landscape. Right now, Utah’s election code allows parties exclusive control over the process they use for endorsing candidates on the ballots for a general election.  Both parties in Utah have opted to nominate and endorse candidates exclusively through a caucus-convention system that is uniform, even though it isn’t mandated anywhere in…