The Utah Republican Party has a communication problem

While I may agree with Sir Winston Churchill when he said that “The best argument against democracy is a five-minute conversation with the average voter,” in my experience this is not the public perception a candidate or party should strive for. Many books, articles and papers have been written about the “art of politics.”  In any of these you will frequently find two items mentioned:  1. Don’t tell the voter you are smarter or better informed than they are; and 2. (very closely associated with the first point) Have a clear,…

UTGOP Held Press Conference on 119th birthday of Utah Statehood and the Caucus Convention System [UPH Wire]

Dear Republican Friend,At a press conference held on the 119th birthday of Utah Statehood and the Caucus Convention System, the Utah Republican Party released polling results regarding its legal challenge to SB54. Survey results indicate that 60% of the general public support a legal challenge to resolve constitutional discrepancies contained in SB54. These results also show that approximately 60% of Republicans statewide do not support the law. Additionally, 56% of registered voters surveyed said they support delaying implementation of the law when made aware that the Utah Republican Party may…

The Two Things That MIGHT Impact Voter Turnout and What They Mean for Count My Vote

Voter turnout is down, but why fewer voters show up is complicated. Competition and duty help explain it, but only partially. Even with Count My Vote changes taking effect this year, don’t expect higher voter turnout.   A New Low for Democracy As a nation, we don’t turn out to vote very consistently, and we’re getting worse.  A New York Times article claims that turnout during the recent mid-terms was the lowest turnout in 72 years with “43 states, less than half the eligible population bothered to vote, and no state broke 60 percent.”…

Want your driver’s license? Register to vote, first.

In a year when Utah elected the first black, Republican woman (and a Mormon, to boot) to Congress , the Beehive State still only managed to turn out an estimated 40% of registered voters to the polls. That’s about 27% of the total population of the state weighing in on who should represent Utah to the US Congress, the Utah Legislature, county councils, and commissions. In other words, only one in four people in our state are contributing to selecting the politicians who will vote on taxes, regulate business, fund roads and…